The needler in the haystack.

Friday, September 17, 2010

Mayor sponsors 'forgiveness workshops'


Header of online (incomplete) version of flyer.
A trip to Plainfield's City Hall is not complete without browsing the literature table in the rotunda.

So, it was with some surprise that I came upon a flyer last night on the way to the Planning Board meeting announcing a series of two workshops sponsored by Mayor Sharon Robinson-Briggs entitled 'Conflict Resolution Through Forgiveness'.

Strangely, the first workshop was scheduled for -- tada! -- that very day.

I did not see the flyers on an earlier jaunt at City Hall this week, and had not noticed them on the city website's public notices page. But when I got home from the Planning Board and checked, there were not one, but TWO copies of the flyer posted online with the headline: 'REVISED - DATE CHANGES' in such large type that the title of the workshop was squeezed off the page.

But that was only the beginning of the 'forgiveness' adventure. The back of the hard copy found at City Hall had detailed dates for the two workshops and trips for the youngsters who enrolled, plus a list of guidelines for participation and an outline of the workshop's goals.

All of that page 2 information is missing from the City's website copies.

How will people know what to do? And when?

I'll forgive Mayor Robinson-Briggs for the mess-up. If they fix it up, they may actually get some participants.


While the flyer was evidently originally created on 9/3/10, the update was made
the morning of the 16th, the day of the first event.
In the meantime, those interested in the Christopher's Program, of which the Plainfield series is a part, can read up on it at a Ledger article that ran in August here.
And stop by City Hall rotunda or the city's website to see if the complete and corrected information is available.



-- Dan Damon [follow]

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1 comments:

Anonymous said...

The amateurism at city hall is very hard to forgive, for they could know what are doing, but they don't.