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Tuesday, May 5, 2020

Jean Mattson passes, photographer, curator, Plainfield cultural icon


Jean Mattson (center), president of the Historical Society of Plainfield
conducts the 2001 annual meeting.


Plainfield cultural icon Jean Mattson passed away on May 1 at her home.

I knew Jean as a photographer, an indefatigable events and exhibits organizer, and as a friend. She was indeed, as her daughter Lois has said, a force of nature.

Her photography was masterful, with attention paid to every detail. (For my notice of her 2010 retrospective show at the Plainfield Public Library, click here.)

Over the years, she began a continuing project of recording the images of the Plainfield men and women who had been crucial in some of the great civil rights struggles of the 20th century.

Eventually, she expanded that project to include a broad segment of Plainfield people and presented the final work as an exhibit at the Plainfield Public Library.




'Young girl on a bench,' from Jean's 2010 show.

She also celebrated her Irish roots and mounted an exhibition of photographs from her travels in Ireland in another Library show.

But perhaps Jean's most important contributions to Plainfield's diversity were the events she organized.

In 2000, Jean put together an exhibit at the Library entitled "100 Years of Plainfield Artists", drawing on Plainfield's many talented artists -- such as painters Riva Helfond, Alonzo Adams, Indira Bailey, and landscape artist Gerri Heydt -- as well as recognizing artists of the past with Plainfield connections, such as Jonas Lie.




Jean at '100 Years of Plainfield Artists' in April, 2000.
(l ro r) Gerri Heydt, Mayor Al McWilliams, and Indira Bailey.


She also put together an exhaustive exhibit of 20th century Plainfield life, decade by decade. Her rich connections to the community resulted in many families lending photographs, ephemera, clippings, programs and other material never seen by the public.

In addition, Jean was a motive force behind Ethfest, a celebration of Plainfield's cultural diversity in music, dance, and arts and crafts. The series of festivals, which ran from 2000 through 2002, was made possible by the support of Mayor Albert McWilliams.







Jean and Mayor McWilliams pose with Guyanese
participants in first Ethfest, 2000.



Peruvian musicians perform at Ethfest 2002.



Crowds thronged Ethfest 2002 at Cedar Brook Park.


She served on the Plainfield Cultural & Heritage Commission and on the board of Plainfield's museum, the Drake House.

But as much as I valued Jean's contributions to the community, she was also a friend.

The first time I met her, shortly after moving to Plainfield, she remarked that her daughter Lois and I "must have been separated at birth," a joke that caused hilarity over the years.

Nat and I were adopted into the family and spent many years together at Thanksgiving, Christmas, and Easter.

Christmas Eve dinner, following Swedish customs and menu, was invariably served at Jean and Moose's landmark Ravine Road home, after which we all would attend Midnight Mass.

For years, when Al McWilliams' star was on the rise as mayor, Jean could be seen riding her bike throughout the neighborhood, soliciting anyone she met to vote for McWilliams, who referred to her simply as "the Citizen".

Owing to Covid-19 restrictions, a small, private funeral will be celebrated Thursday, with Canon Robert Griner officiating. You can read the online obituary at Higgins Home for Funerals here. The family plans a memorial service after the pandemic restrictions are eased.

Jean, I shall miss you greatly, but suspect you are already organizing an exhibition that will outdo all your previous efforts.

Rest in peace.




  -- Dan Damon [follow]

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Sunday, May 3, 2020

Social distance and stay-at-home have helped Plainfield 'flatten the curve'


Expected (upper) vs. actual (lower) cases in Plainfield,
last thirteen days.
.

Plainfielders' adoption of Gov. Murphy's stay-at-home and social distance have enabled Plainfield to 'flatten the curve'. That, plus masks and plenty of good, old-fashioned hand-scrubbing.

But how do you know anything good is happening? News of hospitalizations in alarming numbers and rising death tolls just keep coming at you. It can be frightening, and unnerving even to the most steeled.

But there is a way of knowing how far we are along in the process of a swelling curve and eventual dropping to manageable levels.

It involves the authorities keeping (and sharing) reliable, accurate data on a regular basis.

And a key way of noticing change over time is the number of days it takes for the number of cases to double.

In the chart above, we have been watching for the doubling of the last 'marker' figure of 863 on April 18. Instead of doubling in 8 days, as previously, it looks to be reaching that mark on May2 -- or 13 days -- 5 days more than the last doubling. Evidence of 'flattening the curve'.



In the earliest days of the crisis, when many people were distracted because the numbers seemed so small and others outright disbelieved there was a crisis, the speed with which cases of infection double was astonishing.

In the earliest days of Plainfield's noting growth in cases, they doubled every three days, then every four.

On April, they reached 863 and the most recent double period had been eight days. My suspicion was that we were approaching the crest of the wave, which I detailed in this chart --




The moment it dawned we might be reaching the crest.



An unexpected stay at JFK meant I was away from my computer and tools for a week, but that week gave us a definite glance at how things were developing (that chart is at the top of this post).

I think it is safe to say the coronavirus has crested in Plainfield.

WHAT THIS MEANS


  • Infections will continue, rising more slowly than previously, but rising.


  • It will become apparent through testing that a larger percentage of the population than previously thought has been infected with the virus (many only mildly).


  • Hospitalizations will continue, though at a decreasing pace.


  • The most vulnerable -- the elderly and those with compromised immune systems -- will continue to be at greater risk.


  • The pressure to take the lid off will be considerable -- folks are tired of being cooped up and unable to participate in normal daily life or gatherings (weddings, funerals). But experts warn that taking the lid off too fast could put us back in the same pickle. Part of this, of course, is citizen cooperation. Do your part!

Just on Saturday, Gov. Murphy bowed to growing pressure to re-open State and County parks. No group sports or activities -- yet. Social distance applies. But you can be out in the fresh air!

Gov. Murphy has a six-point program for re-opening businesses and we can expect to see progress on that front in the next few days.

Plainfielders can be proud of the role they have played in 'flattening the curve'.

And we can be proud of our first responders and health care workers who put themselves in deadly danger to administer care to victims.

Other towns are recognizing these people with daily noisemaking at an appointed time. We should be thinking about what Plainfield will do to remember the victims, honor the healthcare workers and recognize citizen contributions.




  -- Dan Damon [follow]

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Wednesday, April 22, 2020

Are Plainfield coronavirus cases peaking?


Tracking new cases, which are falling behind expectations.


April 18 was the start of a period of measuring the next doubling of Covid-19 cases in Plainfield. The previous doubling was in 8 days.

If the pattern of doubling remained at 8 days, we would expect to reach approximately 1,726 cases on April 26. That would mean, on average, 108 new cases per day (based on the 4/10 to 4/18 changes).

This chart is structured with two series -- the ACTUAL counts in front and the EXPECTED counts in the rear.

The chart suggests Plainfield is reaching the peak in new cases.

Unfortunately, since we do not have data on Plainfield hospitalizations (which also would be decreasing at some point), we only have the raw number of cases identified to help us understand what is going on.

I will update this chart with each day's new figures.

Be patient and watch carefully.




  -- Dan Damon [follow]

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Monday, April 20, 2020

A hopeful sign in Plainfield coronavirus cases?


Testing is now going to become very important.


One has to wonder if Plainfield has seen a hopeful sign in the growth of coronavirus cases.

On Sunday evening (April 19), Mayor Mapp reported that the total of coronavirus cases had reached 940.

Based on the chart I developed yesterday (see here), this could be an inkling of good news.

Last night's total was 863. Last night was also the start of a new period of days to see when cases had doubled again.

If the pattern of doubling remained at 8 days, we would expect to reach approximately 1,726 cases on April 26. That would mean, on average, 108 new cases per day (based on the 4/10 to 4/18 changes).

With a total of 863 on 4/18, today's total might be expected to be 863+108 = 971.

What Mayor Mapp reports for today is 940. This is 31 fewer than might be expected on average.

If the trend continues, we would have a pretty strong indicator that Plainfield has topped out.

Be patient and watch carefully.




  -- Dan Damon [follow]

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Sunday, April 19, 2020

How many fewer cases of coronavirus has Plainfield experienced because of social distance and stay-at-home?



Coronavirus cases in Plainfield as of 4/18/2020.
(Click to enlarge or print.)


As Plainfield nears the end of its first month under Gov. Phil Murphy's stay-at-home order, it seems a good time to assess how the coronavirus has impacted our community and survey the heavy lifting that will need to be done for even a minimal recovery.

As of Saturday, April 18, Plainfield has 863 active cases of the virus and has suffered the loss of 21 lives.

No one knows when the pandemic will crest, though the state is projecting around April 25.

It is certain though, that Plainfielders' compliance with the governor's order -- with help from elected officials, robocalls, and policing -- has meant a remarkable "flattening of the curve" of active cases.

In discussing "flattening the curve", it is key to keep an eye on how long it takes for the number of cases to double. Early on Plainfield's rate of doubling was every three days, which quickly lengthened as stay-at-home and social distancing were observed.

Here is what Plainfield's experience looks like --


Date
# Days
# Cases
3/25
3
27
3/28
3
54
4/01
4
108
4/05
4
221
4/10
5
433
4/18
8
863

Increasing the number of days between cases doubling results in "flattening the curve."

If there had been no mitigation efforts by authorities and residents, here's what Plainfield cases could have looked like. Assuming cases doubling every three days (as at the beginning) and there was no other intervention, here is how the picture could have looked --


Date # Days # Cases
3/25
3
27
3/28
3
54
3/31
3
108
4/3
3
216
4/06
3
432
4/09
3
864
4/12
3
1,728
4/15
3
3,456
4/18
3
6,912 est.

So, you can see, the inconvenience of the stay-at-home decree has had an enormous impact on the number of lives NOT put at jeopardy in Plainfield.

Large scale testing would enable authorities to have an even better grasp on how widespread the virus actually is, and how long it would take the healthcare system to get the situation under some measure of control.

In my next post, I will take up the other, non-medical issues facing Plainfield, its leaders and its residents as a result of the coronavirus.





  -- Dan Damon [follow]

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Tuesday, April 14, 2020

Mari Bonini, longtime Plainfield Library trustee and community activist, succumbs to coronavirus


Mari Bonini, during her tenure as
Plainfield Public Library trustee.
(Image courtesy Plainfield Public Library.)


Mari Bonini, longtime Plainfield Public Library trustee and community activist succumbed to the coronavirus today (April 14).

I first met Mari in 1986, when we both began to work for Burgdorff Realtors in Fanwood. We had adjoining desks and often took lunch together at The Corner Store.

Jean Burgdorff had just taken over the real estate business of Hank Fredericks, whose father had begun the office on the corner of South and Martine Avenues in 1921.

Mrs. Burgdorff had in mind to build a strong base in Plainfield sales and recruited an outstanding team under broker Connie Burke that included Mari, Kitty Lynch, and John Grady -- all seasoned pros. I was a newbie.

It wasn't long before Mari and I became personal friends through involvement in Plainfield issues.

Mari served for 14 years as an appointed member of the Board of Education.

She was on the Muhlenberg Hospital Board of Governors, and active in the Women's Auxiliary. In addition, she sat on the board of the Plainfield Visiting Nurse Association.

She was an early supporter of Mayor Al McWilliams and served for several terms as a New Dem member of the Plainfield Democratic City Committee. She was well-known for her role as a Notary Public in notarizing all the New Dem electoral petitions for many years.

Most recently, Mari served for over twenty years on the Library board --he holding every office from President to Treasurer -- and finally retiring in 2018.

When I first met them, Mari and her husband Joe were pillars of St. Bernard's Church, where Joe played in guitar masses, which were popular after the Vatican II reforms.

Arrangements are in the hands of the Higgins Home for Funerals (see the obituary page here). There will be a Live-streamed funeral service at 5:00 PM on Friday, April 17. For more information on the service, contact the funeral home at (908) 756-0017.




  -- Dan Damon [follow]

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Sunday, April 12, 2020

Council sets first-ever virtual meeting for Monday; the public is invited


City Council will hold its first-ever virtual meeting
Monday, and the public can participate.


Plainfield City Council has set its first-ever virtual meeting for Monday (April 13)  at 7:00 PM.

This is a video conference call. You must register to participate. Register here --


https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/4998772791474831628
The principal item of business is the introduction of the 2020 City of Plainfield budget, in excess of $88 million.

The City is already said to be facing a shortfall of tax receipts in the area of $18 million owing to the business shutdown precipitated by the Coronavirus crisis.

How this shortfall will impact both the upcoming budget and current spending ought to be a topic of discussion at the Council meeting.

Other items of interest include a resolution sponsored by Council President Hockaday in support of state legislation mandating the release of COVID-19 data.

Resolution R160-20 authorizes the use of storm recovery funds for unexpected COVID-19 expenditures. That money would be replaced with any FEMA monies received.

There are no instructions about when to call in to participate in the meeting. I would suggest calling the Clerk's office during the day Monday for further information, at (908) 753-3222.

Oh, and by the way ... those who were skeptical when I predicted a tax increase for the 2020 budget can find the exact amount in the resolution introducing the proposed budget.






  -- Dan Damon [follow]

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Saturday, April 11, 2020

How Plainfield got to 472 COVID-19 cases


Growth in Plainfield's COVID-19 cases.



New Jersey case growth (through Thursday).


While the Mapp administration has been assiduous about releasing the latest Coronavirus case figures on an almost daily basis, several readers have asked for figures on the growth of the pandemic virus in Plainfield.

The chart above is based on the numbers released by the Mapp administration. The very first case was reported on March 16. No other cases were reported until March 24, which is where the chart starts.

For comparison, I am putting up the New Jersey chart (to 4/8/20).  State authorities have said they expect the number of cases to peak in the next day or two.

The chart does not show hospitalizations or individuals who have been quarantined.

The fact that Plainfield's numbers did not peak even higher can be attributed to the public's cooperation with the shelter-in-place order by Gov. Murphy and other safety measures (such as masks).

Now is not the time to ease up on any of these measures.





  -- Dan Damon [follow]

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Friday, April 10, 2020

Lady Luck deals Dems a surprise at ballot position drawing


Sample ballot, showing drawing results taped in place.
Image courtesy Union County Clerk's Office.

Lady Luck dealt the Union County Democratic Party something of a surprise on Thursday afternoon at the drawing for the ballot position in the Democratic Primary election.

County Clerk Joann Rajoppi and her assistants conducted the eight-minute event on Facebook Live because of the Coronavirus ban on public meetings. You can view video of the drawing here.

All the years the New Dems wandered in the political wilderness, the Promised Land of politics was Column A, being the first column of candidates the voters see.

Despite the fact that drawing are supposed to be random, it seemed the Regular Democratic Organization always came out ahead. As New Dems we were relegated to the "Siberia" of column E or even further to the right.

So, it was a real surprise that challengers David Rutherford and Emily Morgan ended up with ballot position Column A.

Although not in their own names. Slates of candidates are organized according to the topmost office a candidate is running for.

In the case of the Progressive Democrats, Rutherford and Morgan are running with the indomitable Larry Hamm of Newark, who is running for the nomination for U.S. Senator against incumbent Cory Booker.

So, when the drawing was down, it was Hamm whose name was pasted into the appropriate space, and then Booker in Column B.

Clerk Rajoppi now has the task of filling in all the other spaces, down to the least municipal candidate and then having the printed sample ballot ready to mail to voters in good time.

Because of Gov. Murphy's Executive Order Number 120, and out of an abundance of caution, the Primary Election date has been moved to Tuesday, July 7.




  -- Dan Damon [follow]

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Thursday, April 9, 2020

Negative can be good


The dialysis environment is super clean.


So, Dan's wild & crazy week turns out not to be so much.

I had to get tested for the coronavirus because there were two warning signs of three that are used: shortness of breath and persistent dry cough (the third is fever).

The test results came back Tuesday (I was told it could be up to ten days) -- before I ever even went to my alternative treatment center.

The Plainfield director asked if I would just rather come to Plainfield on an altered schedule. No problema!

All of this was out of an abundance of caution on DaVita's part. All dialysis patients have compromised immune systems.

Infections of all sorts are a constant risk -- so the coronavirus only heightens the attention already paid to  these matters.

Our chairs -- which are about 8' apart -- are wiped down with each use. Everyone wears masks and gloves, changing gloves after every function they perform. These are habits that become invisible, but they protect patients and staff.

I am thankful to DaVita for their thoroughness. And thanks to the many well-wishers who gave encouraging words.

Now, back to business.






  -- Dan Damon [follow]

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Monday, April 6, 2020

Plainfield landlord to tenant: Get a lawyer


Logo of Plainfield's largest commercial property owner.


Under Gov. Murphy's strict shelter-in-place rules, many of Plainfield's small businesses are shuttered, their employees laid off, their livelihoods cut off.

While elaborate care was taken by the Governor to deal with homeowners' mortgages and renters' issues (see here), small business got 'a lick and a promise'.

One restaurant owner confided to a customer who came to pick up a take-out order that their business was down 50% -- and that if it stayed there they could survive, but if it fell they would be out of business.

Then we have Plainfield's largest commercial property owner and manager -- Paramount Assets.

A number of years ago as it became noticeable Paramount was buying up a lot of downtown, I asked a Mapp administration official if they thought it was a good thing to have so much of our commercial property in the control of one company. All I got was a shrug.

When the owner of a popular downtown business approached Paramount recently about forbearance on the rent, they were told "get a lawyer."

Downtown could be in for big trouble if that is the attitude and there are very many businesses who find making the rent difficult -- or impossible.

Suddenly, all those smiling ribbon cuttings look hollow if there is no help for merchants.




  -- Dan Damon [follow]

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This will be Dan's wild & crazy week at dialysis


A coronavirus swab test.


So last Friday at the end of my session, the charge nurse came over and rather nervously informed me that I must go immediately that evening and find someplace to get a test for the coronavirus.

Further that next week (this week) I was not to report to the Plainfield center for dialysis but would be advised what to do.

Why all this? It turns out that an x-ray I had on Thursday revealed a small amount of fluid in my lungs. That, plus a persistent dry cough I have had since mid-November (well before the coronavirus) set off the protocol.

These are two of the three warning signs. The third, a fever, did not appear. I am a low average body temp person -- usually clocking in around
97.7° Fahrenheit.
 
I will be treated at another center designated by DaVita to handle questionable cases in isolation from the general dialysis population.

Once my test results come back (7 to 10 days), I will return to the Plainfield center if I'm not infected with the coronavirus.

I joked with the Plainfield center's director that if I were infected, I would probably already be dead since I am one of those "high risk" individuals of which they speak.

Given all the talk in the media about how comparatively little testing is being done, I was surprised when the Medemerge in Green Brook told me they did the swab testing on a walk-in basis.

"Walk-in" was something of a misnomer as they were conducting business outdoors under triage tents . An intake person took my ID papers plus a description of my vehicle and I was told to go wait in the vehicle.

In a few minutes, a tech came to the car, returned my ID stuff, and told me to follow them to an outdoor location where another tech would take the swab. After that I was told I could leave and that the results would be available in 7 to 10 days.

The large parking lot was full of maybe 60-70 vehicles, many of whom were getting the same test.

So my treatment schedule this week shifts to Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. I will try to post on my regular schedule but I hope you will understand if I'm just too pooped.



  -- Dan Damon [follow]

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Sunday, April 5, 2020

"No wipes in the pipes" -- why disinfecting wipes should not be flushed


Disinfecting wipes are wreaking havoc on sewer systems.

In addition to the threat to lives and damage to the economy, the coronavirus brings another unhappy circumstance.

The explosive use of sanitary wipes to disinfect surfaces has led to problems in the nation's sewer systems when those wipes are flushed down toilets. See an informative article here.

Bottom line: Sanitary wipes should be thrown in the trash and not flushed. They are not designed to disintegrate and are causing expensive problems.

In the trash!




  -- Dan Damon [follow]

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Saturday, April 4, 2020

Without fanfare, new Pemberton Avenue bridge opens


Handsome is as handsome does: the approach to
the new bridge.


A closer view.


And, of course, credit must be given.


The rebuilt --or should I say "new" -- bridge over the Cedar Brook in Cedar Brook Park was unceremoniously opened to traffic on Friday, April 3.

When I came through on Thursday afternoon late for a medical appointment, the barricade at Park Avenue was still up.

When I came through from the pharmacy on Friday evening, the barricades were gone. I confirmed the bridge's opening on Saturday.

I would be a misnomer to refer what happened here as a "rebuilding". This is a new bridge -- or may I say BRIDGE -- replacing the formerly almost unnoticeable passage over the stream's culvert.







The bridge that was replaced was so inconsequential
it can't even be seen amidst the construction gear.


The splendid new white concrete bridge carries the appropriate memorialization of officials on each wall.

The Union County engineers outdid themselves on this one.



  -- Dan Damon [follow]

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Thursday, April 2, 2020

Pandemic can't keep down Plainfield's annual Easter Egg Hunt


Kids can have their own Easter Egg hunts at home
with kits supplied by Plainfield Parks & Recreation.

Plainfield Parks & Recreation's annual Easter Egg Hunt is one of its most eagerly anticipated events.

Each year, upwards of two hundred children show up for the event at Cedar Brook Park.

But what to do when there is a pandemic?

All public events -- including the Easter Egg Hunt -- have been cancelled out of an abundance of caution for resident health and safety.

But that didn't stop the creative crew at P&R. Superintendent Roni Taylor asked herself whether there wasn't a way to bring the event to the kids, since the kids couldn't come to the event.

VoilĂ !

Take Home Easter Egg Hunt kits. Taylor and her staff packed two hundred bags with 2,000 candy-filled eggs and 200 chocolate bunnies for a do-it-yourself Easter Egg Hunt at home.

Given the health concerns, staff sanitized each plastic egg and wore gloves while stuffing the eggs with candy.

Through a partnership with the Plainfield Public Schools, the bags are being distributed to youngsters in the District's regular lunchtime meal distributions by Maschio Food Services this Thursday and Friday.

Here's to a Happy Easter for all, and a Thank You to Recreation and Maschio for making it happen!




  -- Dan Damon [follow]

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Wednesday, April 1, 2020

Will rent and mortgage relief be a concern at Mayor's Facebook Live event tonight?

 


Rent, mortgages, credit card bills will be
on people's minds tonight.


It's the first of the month and folks in Plainfield like everywhere else are getting out their checkbooks.

It's time to pay bills. Rent. Mortgage. Credit Card. Auto loan.

Mayor Mapp will likely be peppered with questions from worried homeowners, anxious renters, and nervous consumers at tonight's Facebook Live event he is hosting.

Between last month and this, many Plainfielders have found themselves out of work -- laid off or furloughed -- and many will have trouble paying all the bills this month. And for the foreseeable future as long as the coronavirus pandemic has the US economy basically shut down.

While Mayor Mapp has been very good about keeping residents up-to-date on COVID-19 cases, and the state's shelter-in-place regulations, these other questions will be much on Plainfielders' minds tonight.

Gov. Murphy has taken steps to help.

Toward the end of last week, Murphy negotiated a 90-day grace period for mortgage payments with 40 banks and financial institutions. The banks promised not to start any new foreclosure proceedings for at least 60 days.

According to terms of the agreement, credit scores will not be impacted, there will be no late penalties, and it is expected that banks will add the missed payments to the end of the loan instead of requiring one big catch-up payment.

However, mortgagees will have to contact their lenders on their own and will have to show that their difficulties are coronavirus-related.

The situation with renters is a little different. Murphy has issued an executive order forbidding landlords to evict tenants for 90 days. Though he says it will stick, I suspect this will be harder to enforce. Once again, the first thing for tenants to do is get in touch with their landlords.

As for credit cards, he is asking card companies to reduce interest rates (fat chance of that!) and waive late fees.

Small businesses -- like the hundreds in Plainfield's Special Improvement District -- have also been impacted by the shelter-at-home decree.

Many stores and other small businesses have been forced to close. Many restaurants are having a tough time getting by on take-out orders. These businesses also have rents coming due. And their landlords may also have mortgages of their own to pay on their commercial properties.

Everyone is hurting and everyone is looking for help. Though the stimulus package passed by Congress last week will bring resources to bear on the problems, there will be a natural delay in getting programs up and running and then businesses will face the usual paperwork before finally getting aid -- whether loans or grants. In the meantime, some will succumb.

Mayor Mapp's Facebook Live event is 6:00 PM today (April 1). Go to the city's Facebook page here.




  -- Dan Damon [follow]

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Sunday, March 29, 2020

Johns Hopkins' tips on dealing with coronavirus


A representation of the coronavirus.

A tip o' the hat to retired Muhlenberg Hospital physician Ted Turner, MD, for forwarding this useful information sheet from Johns Hopkins University.



The virus is not a living organism, but a protein molecule (DNA) covered by a protective layer of lipid (fat), which, when absorbed by the cells of the ocular, nasal or buccal mucosa, changes their genetic code.  (mutation) and convert them into aggressor and multiplier cells.

* Since the virus is not a living organism but a protein molecule, it is not killed, but decays on its own.  The disintegration time depends on the temperature, humidity and type of material where it lies.

* The virus is very fragile;  the only thing that protects it is a thin outer layer of fat.  That is why any soap or detergent is the best remedy, because the foam CUTS the FAT (that is why you have to rub so much: for 20 seconds or more, to make a lot of foam).  By dissolving the fat layer, the protein molecule disperses and breaks down on its own.

* HEAT melts fat;  this is why it is so good to use water above 25 degrees Celsius for washing hands, clothes and everything.  In addition, hot water makes more foam and that makes it even more useful.

* Alcohol or any mixture with alcohol over 65% DISSOLVES ANY FAT, especially the external lipid layer of the virus.

* Any mix with 1 part bleach and 5 parts water directly dissolves the protein, breaks it down from the inside.

* Oxygenated water helps long after soap, alcohol and chlorine, because peroxide dissolves the virus protein, but you have to use it pure and it can irritate your skin in the pure form.

* NO BACTERICIDE SERVES.  The virus is not a living organism like bacteria;  antibiotics cannot kill what is not a bacteria.

* Although debates are present it is best not to shake used clothing, sheets or cloth exposed to the virus .  While the virus is glued to a porous surface, it is very inert and disintegrates only between 3 hours (fabric and porous), 4 hours (copper, because it is naturally antiseptic; and wood, be
cause it removes all the moisture and does not let it peel off and disintegrates); 24 hours (cardboard), 42 hours (metal) and 72 hours (plastic).  But if you shake it or use a feather duster, the virus molecules float in the air for up to 3 hours, and can lodge in your nose.


* The virus molecules remain very stable in external cold, or air conditioners in houses and cars.  They also need moisture to stay stable, and especially darkness.  Therefore, dehumidified, dry, warm and bright environments will degrade it faster.

* UV LIGHT on any object that may contain it breaks down the virus protein.  For example, to disinfect and reuse a mask sun is perfect.  Be careful, sun also breaks down collagen (which is protein) in the skin, eventually causing wrinkles and skin cancer.

* The virus CANNOT go through healthy skin.

* Vinegar is NOT useful because it does not break down the protective layer of fat.

* NO SPIRITS, ie VODKA, serve.  The strongest vodka is 40% alcohol, and you need 65%.

* The more confined the space, the more concentration of the virus there can be.  The more open or naturally ventilated, the less.

* you have to wash your hands before and after touching mucosa, food, locks, knobs, switches, remote control, cell phone, watches, computers, desks, TV, etc.  And when using the bathroom.

* You have to Moisturize HANDS from so much washing of them, because the molecules can hide in the micro cracks.  The thicker the moisturizer, the better.  Coconut butter and oil is perfect.


* Also keep your NAILS SHORT so that the virus does not hide there.


  -- Dan Damon [follow]

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